The YA Shot Blog Tour – Interview with JENNY DOWNHAM

When I was asked to take part in this year’s YA Shot Blog Tour, naturally I jumped at the chance – it’s always good fun to take part in community events like this. Then, when I was told the author I had been given I nearly exploded – JENNY DOWNHAM. JENNY FREAKING DOWNHAM. Author of the outstanding Unbecoming, You Against Me, and Before I Die, she’s one of the best YA novelists working in the UK today – if not the world. I was lucky enough to interview her, and you can read her answers below…

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1. Hello Jenny! Thank you so much for agreeing to do this little interview – I’m a massive fan of your books so it’s a huge honour to be talking with you. Maybe we could start with you telling us a little about your latest book, Unbecoming?

Katie is seventeen and in love with someone whose identity she can’t reveal. Her mother Caroline, is uptight, worn out and about to find her past catching up with her. Katie’s grandmother, Mary, is back with the family after years of mysterious absence and ‘capable of anything,’ despite suffering from Alzheimer’s.

Every morning Mary runs away. She’s desperate to find something, says it’s imperative, but when questioned, can’t be more specific. Katie wants to know what Mary’s looking for. She also wants to know why her mother seems to detest Mary. What was the nature of their original estrangement? It makes Katie question everything she thought was true about her family.

So – three women at different stages of life bound together by a web of lies that only the youngest can untangle.

Oh, and it’s a love story too…

2. Unbecoming covers so many themes – from mental health to sexuality. Did you set out to cover so many topics, or did they evolve natural as the story progressed?

I don’t really think in terms of themes or topics when I begin a project, I’m more interested in characters and the stories they have to tell. I start with them and see where they lead me.

Pinter said a writer’s job is to ‘arrange and listen.’ He believed that characters arrive at their destination through their own impulses, rather than being manipulated to suit a pre-ordained plot. I love writing this way, although it can be time-consuming!

It’s usually about a year or so into a project that I begin to see what I might be writing about.

3. You’ve mentioned in interviews that a lot of Unbecoming drew from your own mother’s Alzheimer’s. Was it taxing to write about a subject so close to your heart, or did you find it cathartic to put it on the page?

Unbecoming is undoubtedly the most personal of my books. I have been a teenager, a mother and a carer and a lot of my own experiences are in there. But perhaps most importantly, yes – my own mother had Alzheimer’s and became very unwell and died while I was writing.

I found it very cathartic writing the book. I used to care for my mum during the day and then I’d go home and try to imagine what it might be like to ‘be’ her. I like to think that writing about the erosion of memory from a sufferer’s perspective made me a better daughter and carer in my mum’s last months.

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4. You talk about some very intense subjects in all your books (Terminal illness in Before I Die, Sexual Assault in You Against Me) – Do you feel it’s important for YA literature to look at these ideas?

When I’m sitting inside the story writing it, I don’t think about themes or ideas, I just get drawn to interesting characters and dramatic situations. My job is to ensure the characters are emotionally truthful and then I find that they lift off the page and begin to tell their stories themselves.

As for what’s ‘important.’ I want to take readers on a journey, rather than give them a message to take away. Books can address difficult situations and confront social issues and help readers deal with real-life challenges. They can transport you, make you think, move you… the list is endless. I hope my readers shift allegiance over and over again with the characters in Unbecoming. I hope they empathise with teenage Mary in her claustrophobic 1950s town and teenage Katie with all her problems at school and home. I hope readers wonder, “What would I do if that were me?” And I hope, by the book’s end, the reader feels they’ve been somewhere and seen some things and that perhaps the world looks slightly different now.

5. YA has been accused of being “too dark” in recent years – do you think that’s true? Are there any subjects you don’t think teenagers and young adults should be reading about?

The LIVES of children and teens are full of tough things. It’s illusory to think we can keep them safe by only allowing them access to certain books. We need to find the joy among the difficult stuff, rather than ignoring the difficult stuff. I don’t think there’s a single subject that can’t be tackled in YA, so long as the author handles the material truthfully and with respect and takes account of all the complexities.

6. Do you have a favourite out of your characters?

I love them all after spending so much time with them – even the difficult ones! But perhaps Tessa in Before I Die has a particularly special place in my heart because her story doesn’t continue beyond the page. I’m very aware of her death date each year and I think how old she would be had she lived.

Dakota Fanning in the movie adaptation Now Is Good

Dakota Fanning as Tessa in the movie adaptation Now Is Good

7. How does a new story start to unfold for you? Do you plan meticulously or start writing and see where it leads?

I never plan. When I’m in the middle of a project and every day I’m throwing thousands of words in the bin, I wish with all my heart that I could be the kind of writer who could follow a path. However, when the book is complete, I’m rather proud that I didn’t need one. At that point, I think it’s exactly the best kind of writing habit and fully resolve to do exactly the same for my next book!

8. Do you treat writing like a full time job? Is your writing day structured or do you only write when the mood takes you?

When I know where a project is going (so about 18 months in), I can write every day and be quite disciplined. Before that, while I’m still exploring, I idle my way in. Most of my writing in the early stage gets chucked, but I find I return again and again to the things that preoccupy and eventually I begin to see what the book might be about. It’s a slow process. And involves lots of coffee and day-dreaming.

9. Why do you write YA?

Because young people are on the cusp of adulthood and that interests me. A teen protagonist can do almost everything an adult can, but because they are boundaried by adult rules and expectations, they have to be far more creative to get what they want. It’s much more exciting to tell a story when there are lots of obstacles in the way.

Also, YA is a happening gig! There are so many books being published in the UK and Ireland that wouldn’t have seen the light of day in past years and would still not be published in many other places in the world. More readers are seeing their own lives represented within stories and this enables them to think not only, ‘What would I do if that happened to me?’ But also to think, ‘That is happening to me.’ Books can sometimes give you the very thing you need – the clue to solve a problem, the strength to keep going, the laughter that makes things more manageable and, perhaps most importantly – the feeling you’re not alone.

10. Who are some of your favourite authors, YA or otherwise?

As a young reader I devoured poetry, folk and fairy tales (Grimm, Andersen), and stories from the Arabian Nights and Ancient Greece. Now I love Raymond Carver, Donna Tartt, Denis Johnson, Ali Smith, Toni Morrison, Maggie O’Farrell, Tove Jansson, John Irving and Kate Atkinson amongst many others. I try to read as a writer might – with one eye and half my brain looking for just how this author make this character so believable, or that sentence so beautiful, or this story such a pageturner…

11. If they made a Jenny Downham action figure, what three accessories would it come with?

Assorted disguises, working wings and a mini espresso maker.

12. Can you tell us what you’re working on next?

I’ve started something new, but it’s very early days. All I have are voices at the moment and I have no idea where they’ll take me. If I had to sum it up so far I’d say it’s about a girl who is furious! She wants her life to be very different and is determined to make it happen.


And that’s your lot! I’d like to thank the YA Shot Team, Carolyn at David Fickling Books, and of course – Jenny herself, for helping put all this together.

You can pick up a copy of Unbecoming just here.

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My Top Ten Reads of 2015!

I’m pretty sure when I did my top ten round up last year, I said something along the lines of “Wow, what an outstanding year it’s been for YA & Books in general” but THIS YEAR BEAT THE PANTS OF IT. Seriously, 2015 has seen the publication of some of the most challenging, powerful and evocative novels for Young Adults that have ever been available. The level of diversity, LBQT+ inclusivity and Mental Health awareness is beyond anything it’s ever been in previous years – and while we still have a long way to go, it makes my heart sing to see the dedication of authors, publishers, readers, bloggers and the whole community to actively shout about diversity and to demand better representation in the books they read. The UKYA community is going from strength to strength too, becoming a glowing warm beacon of passion and friendship across the internet that I always feel privileged to be a part of. OKAY, enough of me doing all this gushing – in no particular order, here’s a list of ten of my FAVOURITEST READS from this year! 

The Lost and The Found by Cat Clarke 

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Cat Clarke has a reputation for harsh, bleak thrillers that have a talent for breaking reader’s hearts in two. The Lost and The Found is no exception to her gritty formula, focusing on a family absolutely torn apart by the loss of their daughter thirteen years ago. It has an emotional level to it that’s uncompromising and refuses to look at the world in terms of black and white, letting Faith, its main character, be angry, bitter and selfishly flawed in ways that are deep and understandable. It’s a powerful book that asks a lot of questions, and isn’t afraid to leave those questions unanswered.

Birdy by Jess Vallance

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FRANCES BIRD IS MY BEST FRIEND. Birdy is a sinisterly dark, acid clever little thriller with so much of a skewed sense of unease. Hinging on an obsessive, out of control friendship and coming from a wonderfully unreliable narrator, it’s a slow burning novel that gradually unravels into a sprawling spider’s web of deception, paranoia and constantly escalating madness. It’s definitely not one for the faint of heart, but if you like a book that pulses with psychological trauma and emotional turmoil, then this is a fast paced gem for you. You awful person.

The Next Together by Lauren James 

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Lauren’s debut managed to do something that never normally happens for me – it managed to be a love story that I felt totally invested in! Her characters are witty and sweet, warm and utterly real, and she lets them be quirky and original, without falling into the usual gender stereotypes, and the use of time travel is clever, original and quite often fascinating – well researched and fully formed, and the way it skips between them creates a fresh, paced feel that keeps the plot hanging and pounding. Not to mention a fantastically mysterious open ended conclusion. I’m really looking forward to her next book in 2016!

The Wolf Wilder by Katherine Rundell 

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Rundell is the only non-YA title on my list, but it’s one I would urge people of all age to read. She’s got such a phenomenal talent with crafting words, like a true artist, she weaves them flawlessly and with passion and love. She refuses to talk down to her audience, and The Wolf Wilder is a captivating tale of wolves, snow and freedom, spearheaded by a wilful heroine who has more than a dash of Philip Pullman’s Lyra Belacqua about her. The wonderful words are beautifully accompanied by gorgeous inky illustrations that make this book the whole package – a children’s classic that we’ll have on bookshop shelves in fifty, maybe even a hundred years time.

The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge

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My first ever Hardinge book, and a darkly twisting novel that swirled with mystery and deception, all pulled along by a brilliantly bright, determined heroine trapped in a male-dominated society that really cuts into the reader. She has such a lyrical, haunting way with words that felt hypnotic and made me so intensely jealous, if I’m honest. She pulls in elements of weird fantasy into a windswept period world, creating a sense of unease and paranoia so tangible it practically drips from every page.

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness 

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Yup. A Patrick Ness book came out, so OBVIOUSLY it’s on my list. It has to be. He’s managed to yet again create a perfect YA novel – tongue firmly in cheek and fully mocking standard tropes and stereotypes from a lot of mainstream Young Adult lit. It’s all done with love though, and it also manages to tell a heart-wrenching coming-of-age story that beautifully looks at the loss of innocence, mental health and the power of friendships and family. Ness manages to blend contemporary drama with weird science fiction vibes seamlessly, shot through with wry humour and a bizarre, charming sense of warmth and sadness. It’s also so wonderfully Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

All Of The Above by James Dawson

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James Dawson has had two books out this year, and All of The Above was the author’s first foray into contemporary, and it’s totally astounding. Filled with chaotic, messy and brilliantly real characters with flaws and so much love, it managed to utterly break my heart and completely sucked me in, by allowing its teen characters to be rude and sexually diverse, shunning labels and focussing on emotions. The dialogue is hilarious and cuttingly witty, and the friendships are achingly beautiful, filled with fury and passion. It’s a triumph of a YA novel that doesn’t talk down to or patronise its audience in the slightest.

Remix by Non Pratt 

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Non’s second book is yet another testament to the fact that she might well have one of the best narrative voices in YA. She manages to make her characters speak exactly how me and my friends always used to (and still do, for that fact), and she tackles some important issues that affect teenagers on a regular basis with stark honesty and superbly hilarious heart. Not to mention, Remix is all about Festivals and Music, something that is very very close to my heart, and the book includes some brilliant nostalgia, band nods and musical feelings that made me squeal with delight.

Unbecoming by Jenny Downham 

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Jenny Downham novels don’t come along very often, but when they do, they’re really something special. Unbecoming is a huge mix of diversity, emotion and themes that should feel clunky and forced, but it simply flows and sings flawlessly. It’s a powerfully important book that touches on family and mental illness, as well as examining sexuality and race, all with respect and intelligence. It’s got so much heart and so much warmth to it.

The Accident Season by Moira Fowley-Doyle 

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Easily one of the most original, haunting, captivating and twistingly brilliant YA novels this year, The Accident Season is an absolute powerhouse of a debut novel, one that uses language like wind and magic, to create an unsettling dreamlike atmosphere that sucks you in totally and completely. It’s filled with diverse, whirring characters (Bea will always hold a special place in my heart), and a dark, creeping mystery that has one foot in Fantasy and one in Contemporary Drama. It’s simply outstanding writing.


RIGHT! That’s your lot! This was one of the hardest Top 10 lists I’ve ever pulled together, because honestly YA publishing has been so unbelievably on fire this year! From debuts like The Sin Eater’s Daughter by Melinda Salisbury and Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli, to the latest instalments in some of my favourite series, like Lockwood & Co’s The Hollow Boy, or the final in Will Hill’s outstanding Department 19 horror series –  I can only hope that 2016 builds on this year and delivers even more. Although I have NO IDEA when I’ll get them all read!

Thanks for Reading, and be wonderful to each other.

D for Darran/Dinosaur/Decepticon

 

Unbecoming by Jenny Downham

If you’re not familiar with Jenny Downham, you really should be. Her bestselling debut, Before I Die was an amazingly powerful examination of mortality and life that was taken to the big screen with Dakota Fanning under the name Now Is Good. Her second novel is the electrifyingly dark You Against Me, which deservedly won the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize. Her latest novel, Unbecoming, is out in September, and blows her previous brilliant pieces of writing clean out of the water.

Don't get me started in how gorgeous this is.

Don’t get me started in how gorgeous this is.

Katie’s life is complicated. Her mother is piling pressure on her to succeed in her exams, and her friends have abandoned her completely after she kissed Esme, her best friend. She’s alone in the world, her Dad with his new family, her Mum at work all the time, and her brother Chris at his special needs school most days – Katie has no control over her life, and nothing she wants to do even if she did. But when Mary turns up, life suddenly becomes much more interesting – because Mary is Katie’s grandmother, a grandmother she never really knew she had. Mary is in the early stages of dementia, and after her partner Jack dies, she’s left alone and confused with nowhere to go. Her daughter had hoped never to see her again, but Mary has no-one to turn to, and her memories are fading with each day. Katie is determined to look after her ailing grandmother, and to repair the yawning gulf that separates her elderly relative from her mother, but some memories unlock secrets, and some secrets can do more damage. Katie needs to piece together the truth from a stubborn, uncommunicative mother and the rapidly vanishing memories of Mary to try and work out the strange, omnipresent darkness in her family’s past.

Unbecoming shouldn’t work. It shouldn’t. In theory, it’s trying to do too much at once, cover too many themes. What it should be is chaotic and meandering. What it actually is, is tight and sprawling and beautifully, perfectly crafted – like a strange tangle of coloured wools that look so dissimilar, but have been woven together which such skill and talent to create something staggeringly breathtaking.

Move over, John Green.

Move over, John Green.

Katie, the main character of the novel, is a superbly written young girl, full of fire and drive, as well as open uncertainty and anxiety. She’s trapped in a world she can’t escape, but she’s starting to scratch the surfaces of what her life could be, looking at the memories of Mary and trying to escape the control of her mother. But in amongst all her burning passion for a wider world, she’s filled with guilt and a strong need to do right by her exhausted but overbearing mother –  and this mix makes her a sweet, caring and immediately engaging protagonist. Mary is absolutely heartbreaking, the parts of the book from her point of view are bittersweet and filled with pure, unrestrained emotion. The way time meanders and snaps back and forth for her is never confusing to read, but her confusion is palpable in every line, and her muddled memories are all at once heartwarmingly bright and innocent, and tinged with an edge of sadness that meant I had a lump in my throat pretty much at all times. Her carefree attitude combined with her constant need to do the right thing makes her a flickering and unique character full of passion and fire. Caroline (Katie’s mother and Mary’s daughter) is also a superb contrast of emotions and personalities, so fearful of the world and of what it could do to her children, but so full of resentment and passionate rage towards her mother. All of Jenny’s characters are brilliantly, faithfully portrayed on the page, and she never lets them be flawless heroes or two dimensional villains – Chris is emotionally articulate and loved, and Simona is firey, strident and stubborn.

So dark, so strong.

So dark, so strong.

It’s not just Jenny’s characters that shine, though – her writing style is totally flawless, lyrical and philosophical, drifting across the page like sweet incense. Unbecoming reads like a Beautiful South song, messy and heartfelt and so close to home that it sees all the beauty in the mundane and everyday. Even the horribly painful moments have a sheen to them because her writing style is so fluid and gorgeous – every word weighs with purpose and emotion, and she never wastes a single one. It’s a dozen glorious threads and every single one of them sings and vibrates in harmony to create a bigger story. There’s plot twists and darkness that’s handled with intelligence and sensitivity, as well as staggering passion for life that made my heart balloon in my chest, as well as bringing me to tears on multiple occasions. Jenny handles dementia and depression and mental health achingly well, and her look at the development of Katie’s sexuality is subtle, tasteful and expertly woven into the larger plot. Mary’s dementia is so well handled, actually, that it couldn’t help but break my heart over and over again.

Unbecoming is a powerfully important YA novel, covering three generations of women, each with secrets and vibrancy that leap and skip about the pages, examining so many vital themes of sexuality and mental health. It’s a true triumph of writing, and Jenny Downham may well be one the all time greats. This is a classic in the making.

Thanks for reading, ya’ll.

D

P.S. You can pre-order Unbecoming HERE – out in September.

As always, thanks to Phil Earle for the proof. He’s never given me a bad book yet.

Things to look out for in 2015!

Greetings! I was recently flicking through The Bookseller’s rather fantastic feature on upcoming Children’s & YA books over the Summer and into the back end of this year, and there’s some very exciting releases! So, I thought I’d compile a little snapshot of books that you should keep an eye out for in the next EIGHT MONTHS. Now, some of these I’ve been lucky enough to have read already, such is the life of a Bookseller. However, I’ve plonked them on this list ANYWAY, because they’re fabulous books that you should definitely pick up when they go on sale. Originally this post was going to be 15 Books in 2015! But, yeah. Too many books. Sorry. I got lost.

We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Nielsen (12th of May, Andersen Press)

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When Phil Earle recommends me a book, it’s always a corker (see The Art of Being Normal), and he’s super passionate about this debut Middle Grade/Younger Teen title which can only mean it’s a mixture of heart and passion that will make waves. I’ve got a copy somewhere on my TBR pile, but other bookselling pals of mine are already raving about the sweet, heartfelt and touching plot, reminiscent of RJ Palacio’s Wonder.

Pre-Order Here!

In Darkling Wood by Emma Carroll (2nd of July, Faber & Faber) 

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Already the author of two phenomenal MG titles (the creepsome Frost Hollow Hall & beautiful The Girl Who Walked on Air), Emma Carroll is returning this Summer with what sounds like another fantastic blend of magic and realism. It seems set to capture the quirky, folklorish environment that makes brilliant fairy stories like Michelle Harrison’s Thirteen Treasures so perfect. I’m expecting a brilliantly entertaining and gripping read for those long Summer evenings!

Pre-Order Here!

The Accident Season by Moïra Fowley-Doyle (18th of August, Corgi)

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Already being hailed as this year’s We Were Liars, The Accident Season is another book that I have a proof of in my TBR pile that I’ve yet to get to, but again I’m very intrigued by the idea behind it. It seems like it’s going to bring in a painfully beautiful, melancholy narrative that will cause some pretty hard emotional reactions (especially from me, I cry at everything!). The jacket is beautiful, and early feelings seem to be overwhelmingly positive. It should be a great read!

Pre-Order Here!

Way Down Dark by J.P. Smythe (2nd of July, Hodder & Stoughton) 

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Very intrigued by this one, the first YA title from a hugely well respected Sci-Fi author. Normally I’m hesitant of adult authors hopping on the Teen Fiction bandwagon, but this book, the first in a planned trilogy, promises a claustrophobic spaceship setting that definitely ticks a big box for me, combined with murder and obsessive cults, so I’ll certainly be giving it a go as soon as possible. Love the jacket too… Might it feed my love of Sci-Fi Horror? Here’s hoping!

Pre-Order Here!

The Marvels by Brian Selznick (15th of September, Scholastic Press) 

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Brian Selznick is a stunningly creative writer, and I’d add him to this list without even knowing a synopsis of his next book. The author of The Invention of Hugo Cabret and Wonderstruck, Selznick is unrivaled when it comes to fusing haunting, gorgeous illustrations with emotionally articulate and powerful stories. All I know about The Marvels is that it’s set in 18th Century London, and it weaves two seemingly separate stories together using 400 pages of what I’m sure will be astounding illustration and 200 pages of text.

Pre-Order Here!

Demon Road by Derek Landy (7th of August, Harpercollins) 

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I’ve always been a massive fan of Landy’s twisted, witty and downright explosive Skulduggery Pleasant series, which came to an end last year. His new series, planned as a trilogy, sees him up his writing to a YA level (which makes sense, since a huge part of his fanbase will have grown up with Skulduggery and are now teenagers and young adults). It looks like it’s set to be full of supernatural horror, twists and vibrant lead characters, all wrapped up in the dark sense of humour we’ve all come to know and love from Mr. Landy.

Pre-Order Here!

Am I Normal Yet? by Holly Bourne (1st of August, Usbourne) 

After the brilliant success in the Paranormal Romance of Soulmates, followed by the brilliantly sharp contemporary The Manifesto on How To Be Interesting, it seems Holly Bourne is an author who can give any genre a good go. I’m already sold on the title, and the contemporary plot line is going to tackle anxiety and other mental health issues that I would love to see approached intelligently and with respect within the YA sphere. I’m expecting a strong, strident voice, with heart and humour.

Pre-Order Here!

The Tattooed Heart by Michael Grant (22nd of September, Electric Monkey) 

The second book in Grant’s brilliant, dark and shocking Messenger of Fear series, which managed to utterly captivate me in book one. If his GONE series proved one thing, it’s that he’s so superbly talented when it comes to developing creeping, unfurling mythologies and sudden, brutal and visceral shocks and twists. I’m sure we’re going to have some truly grotesque descriptive sequences and a bigger peak into the world and history of the Messengers.

The Unbecoming by Jenny Downham (3rd of September, David Fickling Books) 

It’s hard to believe that it’s been FIVE YEARS since Jenny Downham’s award winning You Against Me, so I’m very excited about a new novel from her. Very well known for her debut Before I Die (aka Now Is Good), Downham is a skilled writer at unfolding complex and beautiful emotions. The Unbecoming is going to be epic, covering 50 years and following three generations of the same family. I think we can look forward to seeing some heartbreak, some uplifting chapters and some painfully grounded tragedy, all with her trademark heart and hope.

Asking For It by Louise O’Neill (3rd of September, Quercus)

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The sophomore novel from the author of the YA Book Prize winner Only Ever Yours, this looks set to be just a dark, powerful and important. It looks like it’s going to be discussing and working with the ideas of rape, consent and victim blaming, so I’m expecting this to be pretty controversial, but also probably very necessary in today’s culture and political atmosphere. Louise has already proved that she’s not afraid of going after emotional and visceral subjects, and that’s going to continue.

Remix by Non Pratt (4th of June, Walker)

I reviewed this the other week right here, but I’ll reiterate what I said then – Non is one of the brightest shining stars of UKYA, and Remix is the perfect showcase of her talents for messy, realistic teenagers and perfectly formed, believable dialogue that snaps and crackles with youthful energy. Much like her debut, Trouble, Non is so brilliant at creating characters that I love and feel invested in, and this time she weaves in the energy and hopefulness of teenagers on the cusp of adulthood, all within the gloriously chaotic world of a Music Festival.

Pre-Order Here!

All of the Above by James Dawson (3rd of September, Hot Key Books)

This is set to be James Dawson’s first contemporary novel, but in his work in the YA horror sphere with Say Her Name and Under My Skinhe’s already proven he has a sharp talent for witty characters and brilliant, hilarious dialogue. All of the Above promises to be his rudest and most mature to date, but it looks like it’ll be examining anxiety and peer pressure, which I can only imagine will be portrayed beautifully and sensitively.

Pre-Order Here!

Silence is Goldfish by Annabel Pitcher (1st of October, Orion)

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Both My Sister Lives On The Mantelpiece and Ketchup Clouds have been contemporary YA novels that have both completely absorbed me and emotionally wrecked me in different ways, showing that Award Winner Annabel Pitcher is a versatile and powerful writer. Silence is Goldfish is a brilliant title, and it looks like the book is going to be another great examination of growing up, and loss of innocence and the way our views towards family and adults change as we get older.

Pre-Order Here!

Darkest Night by Will Hill (4th of June, Harpercollins)

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Will Hill’s Department 19 series is one of my favourite YA series, and it’s finally coming to a close. Compulsive, gloriously gore-splattered Vampire fiction, I would recommend this to anyone who’s a fan of fast, intelligent horror and action. Will has already promised death and emotional turmoil in this final installment, where he carries on his combination of classical horror literature and pulse-pounding action.

Pre-Order Here!

The Wolf Wilder by Katherine Rundell (10th of September, Bloomsbury)

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The award winner of future Children’s classic Rooftoppers has turned to a snowy atmosphere for her next adventure, set in the harsh, cold Russian forests. Rundell is a masterful writer with a lyrical, beautiful writing style, and I can see her capturing this tale of harsh environments and loyalty, the story of a young girl and her mother against a murderous force in the woods, absolutely brilliantly. I’m sure it’s going to be uplifting and captivating and I cannot wait.

Pre-Order Here!

The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness (27th of August, Walker)

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If you missed my glowing review the other day, let me tell you that Patrick Ness’ next novel is a phenomenal character examination that’s full of pain, emotion, hope and melancholy. Another stellar example of why he’s such a brilliant YA writer, his characters in The Rest of Us are so perfectly messy and realistic, and he approaches mental health and the uncertainty of growing up with intelligence and respect. He also plays on standard YA tropes and themes to perfect effect, mocking with just the right amount of adoration.

Pre-Order Here!

First Class Murder by Robin Stevens (30th of July, Random House) 

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Golly! Time for another caper from the fantastic detective duo that is Daisy Wells and Hazel Wong, this time taking on a Murder on the Orient Express twist. The first two novels, A Murder Most Unladylike and Arsenic for Tea, have been roaringly good fun to date, and I can’t wait to see where Robin’s vibrant, intelligent detectives end up next! More hilarious use of Blyton-esque language and genuinely gripping and well formed mysteries will make this another gem of a children’s novel.

Pre-Order Here!

Another Day by David Levithan (30th July, Electric Monkey)

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Every Day is getting a sequel! Of sorts, at least. Another Day revisits the events of Levithan’s phenomenal novel, but retelling the story from the perspective of Rhiannon. Where the first book looked at the nature of the self, and what it meant to be you when things like race, gender and sexuality are stripped away, Another Day will look at what it is like to love someone who is always different. I’m expecting an emotionally electric and intelligent plot, using Levithan’s characteristic beautiful writing style to uncover some difficult truths and create some diverse and heartfelt characters.

Pre-Order Here!

 

This is just a handful of the brilliant YA and MG titles due put this year, but there’s loads more! Feel free to grab me on Twitter for more recommendations or book chat – @ShinraAlpha

Thanks for reading!

D